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Types of Pasta

October 25th, 2012 Healthy Living

Pasta is a great choice for dinner because its kid friendly, tastes good, is inexpensive and can be made into a variety of different dishes. Next time you go shopping for pasta, consider buying something different than spaghetti. The many kinds of noodles differ in shape and texture, creating many opportunities for flavorful and exciting cuisine. Here's a list of some of the more common types, as noted by Real Simple magazine and Pasta-recipes-made-easy.com.

1. Angel hair. This is the thinnest form of long pasta and is quick to cook. It's good for tossing with light sauces and seafood dishes.

2. Cavatappi. These tubular corkscrew shapes originate from Southern Italy and are good for a variety of sauces.

3. Elbow macaroni. These short, C-shaped tubes are great for baked dishes, salads and soups and are a macaroni and cheese classic.

4. Farfalle. Also known as bow ties in the U.S., this fun shaped pasta is good for making salads. Farfalle is the Italian word for butterflies.

5. Ditali, or ditalini. These short tubes look like tiny rings and make a great addition to hearty soups.

6. Fettuccine. This long, flat pasta translates as "little ribbons" in Italian and goes well with creamy sauces.

7. Fusilli. These tightly curled spirals translate to mean "little spindles" and are good for holding vegetable and cream sauces.

8. Linguine. These long, flat noodles, which mean "little tongues," are thinner than fettuccine but still great for tossing with many types of sauces, like clam sauce.

9. Orzo. This rice-shaped pasta is good for adding density and flavor to soups and salads.

10. Penne. This tubular pasta has ridges on the outside and the ends are cut diagonally to resemble quills, which they're named after. They are very versatile and good for a variety of sauces.

11. Rigatoni. These short, fat tubes are ridged on the outside. They work well in baked dishes and with chunky sauces.